Your Dog’s Name is Not a Good Password

Buster and Champ are great names for dogs. But neither of them make a good online password – especially when those are the names of your dogs!

Password Trust GuardOne of the most annoying things you’ll come across on the web is when a website forces you to create a complicated password. You’ve had to do it before—with capitals, and numbers, and special characters. You end up with something like “Beth@ny12”, which looks more like a 12-year-old’s screen name than a password. The worst part? Those passwords aren’t secure. Here’s why.

Dictionary Attacks

Brute force is usually what people think of when hacking comes to mind. That’s when hackers guess every possible combination of every letter and character. It’s a technique that’s used, but only as a last resort. Hackers start, instead, with dictionary attacks. These involve taking a very large and comprehensive list of common passwords, characters, and substitutions, and then using them to guess your password. So, yes, they’re going to guess “password”, or even “p@ssw0rd1”.

The problem, here, is that people pick passwords out of habit. The computers have been forcing us to when they make us turn “Scruffy” into “$CruFfy89”. We use short, familiar words because it’s the only way we can remember those ridiculous passwords. But that only makes them easier to guess for the dictionary attacks. Online bullies know all of the words we pick, and all the substitutions we’re going to use. And heaven forbid we forget our password. Then we just reset it to a password we already use somewhere else…which is another cardinal password sin.

Better Passwords

So how do we protect ourselves? The best option is to add more letters, preferably in the form of a random word (or words), as words are easier to remember than substitutions. If you have the option, instead of “$CruFfy89”, do a few random words, like “correcthorsebatterystaple”. You’ll get way more bang for your security buck that way. There are online password creation and storage companies like LastPass that can create and store unique passwords for you. That way, you only have to remember one password in order to access all of your accounts.

Online security should be a big deal for you! It seems like every other day we hear about another big company that got hacked. So before you give some online business your personal information and unique, non-personal password, make sure the website has a Trust Guard trust seal on it, verifying that it is secure.


Special thanks to writer Stephen Porritt.

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