Five Ways to Combat Cyber Crime

Like most theft, cyber crime tends to follow the path of least resistance.  For paid security monitoring for your website, contact Trust Guard. They’ll help you combat cyber crime by scanning your website for more than 75,500 known vulnerabilities used by hackers to really screw things up.

Here are five online hygiene tips anyone can follow, for free, to make life harder for people looking for an easy way to steal your personal or financial information – whether you’re a business owner or not.

Combat Cyber Crime1. Use multifactor authentication. This includes entering a password plus a code or a question that only you know. Google’s authenticator app is a quick download and works easily with many services including Amazon and Gmail. It’s worth checking to see if there’s a multifactor option every time a website asks you to fill out bank account or credit card information.

2. Don’t share passwords across websites. Almost everyone shares at least a couple of passwords. Don’t. There are plenty of inexpensive password manager phone apps that can help you with this, notably the open-source Password Safe and LastPass.com.

3. Refuse to give up information whenever you can. Best Buy doesn’t need your phone number. The more information you part with, the more can be used against you if the retailer is hacked. Ron Swanson from Parks and Rec didn’t have it right all of the time, but staying off the grid as much as possible is always a good idea.

4. Check your bank balance regularly. Thieves often try for a small purchase to see if the card works before they go shopping; in particular, look for easy-to-resell items like gift cards and credits on online marketplaces. When it comes to financial accounts, you also want to change the passwords to those accounts every three months at a minimum.

5. Close down services that you don’t use anymore. Do you still have a Steam account from that one time you bought a PC game all your friends were talking about? Are you sure? Is it linked to a credit card you still use? These are the easiest ways for hackers to steal in bulk, and the one-off purchase you make on impulse is probably the one you’ll unthinkingly reuse your old password on, too. For these types of purchases, it’s a good idea to get a pay-as-you-go debit card that you load from another card with only the amount you need to make the one-off purchase.

Everyone can and should do their small part to keep their personally identifiable information safe and protected. These five tips should help.


Special thanks to The Guardian for supplying much of the information found in this article.

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