What Victims of Identity Theft Can Do

If you haven’t heard, Equifax, one of the three big credit reporting agencies in the United States, announced that it suffered a massive data breach. More than 143,000,000 records were compromised, including email addresses, names, social security cards and credit card numbers.

If you believe you were the victim of identity theft, here’s what you can do:

  1. Close the accounts that you believe may have been tampered with or opened fraudulently. Use the government’s Identity Theft Report, which can be found at www.identitytheft.govIdentity Theft
  2. File a police report and get a copy to submit to your creditors and others who may require proof of the crime. If you have proof of identity theft, be sure to take that proof with you when you go to file your police report.
  3. File your complaint with the FTC at www.consumer.ftc.gov. The FTC maintains an identity theft database that law enforcement agencies use for investigations. Filing a complaint also helps the FTC better assist you, as the commission learns more about online theft of identities and the problems it creates.

If you are a business owner with an SSL certificate but without protection from hackers, contact Trust Guard, the leader in website security to protect you and your online visitors from hackers.

More Hackers Are Doing More Damage

If you’re concerned about cyber security these days—and you should be—reading the headlines isn’t exactly going to give you any peace of mind. Sometimes it seems that hackers just have the upper hand.

Equifax_LogoOne such headline from TheRegister.co.uk tells us that “Energy sector biz hackers are back and badder than ever before.” Cyber security firm Symantec believes that a resurgent group of hackers dubbed “Dragonfly 2.0” poses more of a threat than ever. They were apparently behind a massive attack on the Ukraine’s electrical grid, which affected hundreds of thousands of people. The group now poses a threat to the electrical grids of Western nations.

Newsweek reports that the recent attack on HBO caused the loss of seven times more data than the Sony cyber attack, which back in 2014 gizmodo.com called possibly “the worst corporate hack in history.” The losses of data include things like employee medical records, Social Security numbers and TV show scripts.

And then there is the Equifax hack that lost personal data of 143 million people—yes, that’s a million. And the list goes on and on.

It would seem a good time to take cyber security seriously by using Trust Guard. If they’re on your side, they will scan for the more than 75,500 known vulnerabilities so any hacker-inviting weakness in your computer system can be fixed before the hackers can put you in a fix.

The name of the game is staying ahead of the bad guys, and you almost certainly can’t do that on your own. Trust Guard will also provide you with a Trust Seal for your web site so visitors can see that their personal data will be protected if they make a purchase on your site.

Don’t let your business make it on the hacking headlines; let Trust Guard worry about warding off hackers so you can focus on your business.  


Sources:
http://gizmodo.com/the-sony-pictures-hack-exposed-budgets-layoffs-and-3-1665739357/1666122168
http://www.newsweek.com/hbo-cyberattack-sony-hack-leak-game-thrones-645450
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/06/energy_sector_attacks
https://us.norton.com/internetsecurity-emerging-threats-143-million-people-exposed-in-equifax-data-breach.html?om_em_cid=hho_email_US_BLST_ACT_2017_09_databreach_Equifax

 

What You Should Know about the Equifax Breach

What: Data collected by Equifax, one of the three credit report giants, was hacked. “This is clearly a disappointing event for our company, and one that strikes at the heart of who we are and what we do. I apologize to consumers and our business customers for the concern and frustration this causes,” said Richard F. Smith, Equifax CEO, in a statement. 

When: In early August, Mandiant (a cybersecurity firm) was approached by Equifax to figure out what was going on, according to CNN News. Mandiant aided in the investigation and determined from May 13 through July 30 a spate of hacks occurred.

Who: 143 million Equifax customers have been affected. Their information, including social security numbers, addresses and birth dates were accessible by hackers.

Soon after the breach was announced to the public, Susan Mauldin, former chief security officer and Dave Webb, former chief information officer, retired.

How: Like many of these cases, the how is still a mystery. But Apache Struts, a tool used for Equifax’s online dispute portal, has become the scapegoat, being blamed for vulnerabilities, making the breach easier for hackers.

Apache Struts released this statement:

“We as the Apache Struts PMC want to make clear that the development team puts enormous efforts in securing and hardening the software we produce, and fixing problems whenever they come to our attention. In alignment with the Apache security policies, once we get notified of a possible security issue, we privately work with the reporting entity to reproduce and fix the problem…”

What you can do: If you believe you might have been impacted, visit Equifax’s Cybersecurity Incident & Important Consumer Information page: https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/.